Furries and Genetics?

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Daz, Tue Jul 19, 2011 2:31 pm

And then when they discover the group they spontaneously swap genetic information.

Usually alcohol is involved though.[/quote]

What?...... *Mind Ticks Over* :wroll:


Oh!.. *giggles* :wgrin:

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VixVulpe, Sat Oct 22, 2011 9:01 am

I don't really it's so much of a genetic thing, and probably more a learned behaviour

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VixVulpe, Sat Oct 22, 2011 10:01 am

I don't really it's so much of a genetic thing, and probably more a learned behaviour

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Daz, Wed Nov 02, 2011 2:34 pm

This sounds like something from a strange Twilight Zone film at the moment.

However, as for the relations in genetic designs, we are all related to a variety of fauna as result of passing through a thing called evolution.

Hell, if we can a similar THC chemical nerve sensors as result of a Sea Cucumber, I don't see why we can't have partial genetic similarity to the neighbours Malamute.

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Daz, Wed Nov 02, 2011 3:34 pm

This sounds like something from a strange Twilight Zone film at the moment.

However, as for the relations in genetic designs, we are all related to a variety of fauna as result of passing through a thing called evolution.

Hell, if we can a similar THC chemical nerve sensors as result of a Sea Cucumber, I don't see why we can't have partial genetic similarity to the neighbours Malamute.

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roland_perteev, Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:44 pm

I have no degree to back me up, but I've read some stuff (by really smart biologists like Richard Dawkins - he's awesome!) about how environmental factors do affect your genetics, either by changing the way a gene expresses itself or possibly even activating (or de-activating?) it, and as such it is plausible that the presence of a household pet could affect someone's genetic makeup.

But, like so many before me, I think it is safe to say that a response such as feline behavioural traits when one was raised with a household cat would have more to do with empathy and learned behavior than DNA.

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roland_perteev, Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:44 pm

I have no degree to back me up, but I've read some stuff (by really smart biologists like Richard Dawkins - he's awesome!) about how environmental factors do affect your genetics, either by changing the way a gene expresses itself or possibly even activating (or de-activating?) it, and as such it is plausible that the presence of a household pet could affect someone's genetic makeup.

But, like so many before me, I think it is safe to say that a response such as feline behavioural traits when one was raised with a household cat would have more to do with empathy and learned behavior than DNA.

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Daz, Wed Dec 21, 2011 7:27 pm

Now, However here is an interesting thing...

Could certain traits be transmitted through the genes of family members, without nesscarily requiring social interaction.

Because with animals such as the common Rat, they have instincts passed down through their genetic tree without the need for teaching such instincts or behaviours.

Example:

If a rat was to eat a poisoned bait and survive the toxins, Not only does it's body immediatly build a tolerance to withstand such a toxin, it will also remember the sensations from that bait e.g (taste , smell).

Now this rat was to mate with another rat, this resistance and memory is sent with the DNA and will be immediatly wired in the brains of many future generation rats as a natural instinct and ability.

This is the reason why poisons used on Rats are frequently changed, due to their quick adaptive skills and tenacity against the elements.

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Daz, Wed Dec 21, 2011 8:27 pm

Now, However here is an interesting thing...

Could certain traits be transmitted through the genes of family members, without nesscarily requiring social interaction.

Because with animals such as the common Rat, they have instincts passed down through their genetic tree without the need for teaching such instincts or behaviours.

Example:

If a rat was to eat a poisoned bait and survive the toxins, Not only does it's body immediatly build a tolerance to withstand such a toxin, it will also remember the sensations from that bait e.g (taste , smell).

Now this rat was to mate with another rat, this resistance and memory is sent with the DNA and will be immediatly wired in the brains of many future generation rats as a natural instinct and ability.

This is the reason why poisons used on Rats are frequently changed, due to their quick adaptive skills and tenacity against the elements.

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WhiteFell, Thu Dec 22, 2011 2:07 am

I would think it's more likely that all the rats who think the poison is tasty don't pass on any genetic material until you're left with a population of rats which don't much care for it.


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