Furries and Genetics?

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WhiteFell
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Furries and Genetics?

Postby WhiteFell » Thu Dec 22, 2011 3:07 am

I would think it's more likely that all the rats who think the poison is tasty don't pass on any genetic material until you're left with a population of rats which don't much care for it.
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roland_perteev
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Re: Furries and Genetics?

Postby roland_perteev » Thu Dec 22, 2011 6:07 pm

Daz wrote:If a rat was to eat a poisoned bait and survive the toxins, Not only does it's body immediatly build a tolerance to withstand such a toxin, it will also remember the sensations from that bait e.g (taste , smell).

Now this rat was to mate with another rat, this resistance and memory is sent with the DNA and will be immediatly wired in the brains of many future generation rats as a natural instinct and ability.

This is the reason why poisons used on Rats are frequently changed, due to their quick adaptive skills and tenacity against the elements.
I understand that there is (recent-ish) evidence to suggest that Lamarckism actually applies in some instances...
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roland_perteev
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Furries and Genetics?

Postby roland_perteev » Thu Dec 22, 2011 7:07 pm

If a rat was to eat a poisoned bait and survive the toxins, Not only does it's body immediatly build a tolerance to withstand such a toxin, it will also remember the sensations from that bait e.g (taste , smell).

Now this rat was to mate with another rat, this resistance and memory is sent with the DNA and will be immediatly wired in the brains of many future generation rats as a natural instinct and ability.

This is the reason why poisons used on Rats are frequently changed, due to their quick adaptive skills and tenacity against the elements.[/quote]
I understand that there is (recent-ish) evidence to suggest that Lamarckism actually applies in some instances...
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Dark
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Furries and Genetics?

Postby Dark » Thu Apr 05, 2012 8:23 am

well considering humans and dogs evolved together in a symbiotic relationship (also horses and cats to a degree) it is understandable why some of us wish to be canine furries and why there are so many canine furries. dogs have the ability to bark as a way to communicate with humans, dogs, even untrained will still look at where a human points or where a human looks. no other species even apes will do that because their brains aren't programmed too. canines and humans share a much stronger bond than most people realise and its why some people are so attracted to them. its not so much genetics as it is evolution, we have evolved to cherish canines and to be attracted to them and to be friends with them. without dogs or wolves by extension humans would still be hunter gatherers, when we formed a bond with the wolves we could hunt better with their help which led to more food available which allowed for a population growth and left more time for making more humans and developing other skills and tools. also the wolves benefited by having shelter and more food than they could have hunted by themselves... lol im probably gona get flamed for saying all this or something.
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roland_perteev
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Furries and Genetics?

Postby roland_perteev » Mon Apr 30, 2012 7:47 pm

Dogs have undergone a rigorous human-imposed artificial selection process to get them to the point of having such an affinity with humans (this is not evolution is what I'm saying). Additionally it was hardly symbiotic as basically humans were holding all the cards, eliminating dogs with undesirable traits and keeping the ones that were most useful.

So rather than symbiotic evolution (which is what we see in lichen, or in bees and flowers), dogs probably represent mankind's first, and arguably best, experiment in selective breeding.

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